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What does it mean to “shift testing left”?

What does it mean to “shift testing left”? I used to think shifting left meant starting all these testing activities earlier in the process, but I realise it is more than that: it means  doing different things . Shifting left on testing means thinking about architecture and design differently, considering different stakeholders early and continually. Which in turn means shifting left on security, accessibility, and all the other dimensions of quality that we should care about. So shifting left on testing motivates all kinds of assurance activities, which can stop us over-investing in a solution that was never going to work. It is like TDD on steroids. As an unintended consequence, we can remove much of the traditional work that testers would have to do downstream when they only have late sight of the product. Again, we aren’t doing that work earlier, we are setting ourselves up to never need it at all!
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How the Python import system works

How the Python import system works From:  https://tenthousandmeters.com/blog/python-behind-the-scenes-11-how-the-python-import-system-works/ If you ask me to name the most misunderstood aspect of Python, I will answer without a second thought: the Python import system. Just remember how many times you used relative imports and got something like  ImportError: attempted relative import with no known parent package ; or tried to figure out how to structure a project so that all the imports work correctly; or hacked  sys.path  when you couldn't find a better solution. Every Python programmer experienced something like this, and popular StackOverflow questions, such us  Importing files from different folder  (1822 votes),  Relative imports in Python 3  (1064 votes) and  Relative imports for the billionth time  (993 votes), are a good indicator of that. The Python import system doesn't just seem complicated – it is complicated. So even though the  documentation  is really good, it d